Judicial Commission rules on ‘buyer’s remorse’ Magistrate Pithouse

A magistrate who suggested a rape victim had “buyer’s remorse” acted with bias and reinforced outdated stereotypes about sex crimes, a major investigation has concluded.

In a separate incident, Mr Pithouse was found to make victim-blaming comments to another woman who was at the centre of a domestic violence matter.

Well, it’s her right to get beaten up if she wants to, I suppose’’
– Magistrate Richard Pithouse, speaking about a victim of domestic violence during a bail application

Source: Judicial Commission rules on ‘buyer’s remorse’ Magistrate Pithouse

A Supplier Refused To Fill A Face Mask Order For An Australian Abortion Provider Because They’re For “Health Professionals”

Exclusive: Marie Stopes Australia says it only has two weeks worth of face masks left as orders are cancelled in the coronavirus pandemic.

Australia’s largest abortion provider says its supply of face masks and hand sanitiser for carrying out surgical abortions will only last two more weeks after a number of orders from private personal protective equipment (PPE) providers were cancelled or refused in the coronavirus pandemic.

In one instance, a private company cancelled an order from Marie Stopes Australia (MSA) on the basis it was reserving supplies for “health professionals”.

Source: A Supplier Refused To Fill A Face Mask Order For An Australian Abortion Provider Because They’re For “Health Professionals”

Debbie Kilroy has recovered from COVID-19 & is concerned for those in our overcrowded prisons

Debbie Kilroy’s experience with COVID-19 has left her desperately concerned for those in overcroweded prisons across Australia.

Source: Debbie Kilroy has recovered from COVID-19 & is concerned for those in our overcrowded prisons

When staying home isn’t safe: COVID-19, pornography and the pandemic of violence against women

The coronavirus pandemic has brought to the surface the myriad ways in which men’s violence against women manifests. In particular, the increased consumption of material that makes sexualised violence not only acceptable, but desirable, feeds into the ongoing pandemic of men’s violence against women — a pandemic that will still be with us long after the COVID-19 crisis has passed.

Source: When staying home isn’t safe: COVID-19, pornography and the pandemic of violence against women – ABC Religion & Ethics

Free childcare is too good to be true. But could this start a revolution?

Free childcare was one of the goals of second wave feminism, when we took up the cause of gender equity in the 70s. It seemed logical, because children need access to other children and expert care to develop the skills that parents can’t provide, and allowed particularly mothers, as the primary carer, time for paid work and other activities. After all, child rearing was not intended to be the sole responsibility of parents but a community: “it takes a village to rear a child”.

There’s a big benefit for the government by the reduction in the numbers of unemployed on jobkeeker payments. Low-paid female workers are likely to remain in their vital jobs, as will others who are still employed.

This brief glimpse of free care will raise expectations that are unlikely to be met when these one-offs are withdrawn.

Maybe the brief experience of thousands of users of the temporary model will create the demand for a serious revolution in this (and other) community services.

Source: Free childcare is too good to be true. But could this start a revolution? | Eva Cox | Opinion | The Guardian

Compliance with parenting orders may become ‘very difficult, if not impossible’

In a statement issued on Thursday, Chief Justice Will Alstergren of the Family Court of Australia – who is also the Chief Judge of the Federal Circuit Court of Australia – recognised that parents are “naturally deeply concerned” about the safety of their children in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, and will be even more worried about how it will impact upon a parent’s or carer’s ability to comply with parenting orders.

In the highly unusual circumstances now faced by Australian parents and carers, Alstergren CJ continued, there may be situations that arise “that make strict compliance with current court orders very difficult, if not, impossible”.

“This may be caused, for instance, where orders stipulate that contact with a parent occurs at a designated contact centre, which may not currently be operating. Or, the “pick-up” arrangements of a child may nominate a particular school, and that school is now closed. Many state borders are also closed. In addition, there may be genuine safety issues that have arisen whereby one parent, or someone in close contact with that parent, has been exposed to COVID-19, and this may restrict the safe movement of a child from one house to another,” his honour reflected.

“If the parties are unable to agree to vary the arrangement, or if it is unsafe to do so, and one or both parents continue to have real concerns, the parties are at liberty to approach the court electronically and seek a variation of the orders.”

“Also, during this period of dispute, parents should ensure that each parent or carer continues to have some contact with the children consistent with the parenting arrangements such as by videoconferencing, social media, or if that is not possible, by telephone,” his honour said.

At all times, parents or carers must act reasonably, Alstergren CJ reflected.

Source: Compliance with parenting orders may become ‘very difficult, if not impossible’ – Lawyers Weekly

On childcare, we can’t ‘waste the crisis’ and go back to the old system

In a remarkable turn of events, yesterday Education Minister Dan Tehan urged the parents of Australia to send their little comrades to kindy.

Well, not quite.

But he did announce that all childcare – yes, essentially all — would be free from Sunday night onwards for the next three months, with the strong possibility that the new arrangements would remain in place for as long as six months.

During World War II in the United States, another time of great disruption when women were needed in manufacturing jobs as men were shipped off to the front, President Franklin Roosevelt funnelled funding from a wartime infrastructure bill to create and run a network of child-care centres. Without these, there would have been no Rosie the Riveter.

Unfortunately, President Harry S. Truman shut the childcare centres down shortly after Japan surrendered. And judging by Mr. Tehan’s interview on the ABC yesterday, he hopes to follow Truman’s lead. “We would love to be able to go back to the system we previously had in place,” he said.

To put it mildly, that would be a huge mistake.

Source: On childcare, we can’t ‘waste the crisis’ and go back to the old system

SA reproductive rights experts worried coronavirus is creating more barriers to abortion

Reproductive rights groups are asking for urgent legal changes to allow access to abortion drugs through telehealth, saying coronavirus restrictions will likely to lead to an increase in unplanned pregnancies.

Source: SA reproductive rights experts worried coronavirus is creating more barriers to abortion – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Women released from prison are at much greater risk of violence

We found women released from prison were 16 times more likely to die from violence than women of the same age in the general population. Although the vast majority of people in prison in Australia are men, women who experience incarceration are particularly vulnerable to violence.

The number of women, particularly Indigenous women, in Australian prisons is increasing. It is estimated that between 57% and 90% of women in prison have been victims of violence.

Women who have been to prison should be a priority group for violence prevention. They need enhanced transitional support when leaving prison to secure safe housing, employment and access to mental health, alcohol and other drug services.

Source: Women released from prison are at much greater risk of violence