Five facts every Australian needs to know about men at work

The Wife Drought persists.

76% of full-time working fathers in Australia have a spouse who either did not work at all in the paid workforce , or worked part-time. 15% of full-time working Australia mothers had the same deal.

The Parent Pay Gap is real.

When it comes to total income earned over 40 years, a man without children, on average, will earn $2 million. For dads, this goes up to $2.5 million. A woman without children will earn $1.9 million but for mums it falls to $1.3 million.

Stay at home dads are rare. Ridiculously rare.

Back in 1991, 4% of families in Australia had a stay at home dad. In the year 2016 that increased by a massive 1%. Just 5% of Australian families have a stay at home dad.

Part-time work is still for mums.

When it comes to part time work in families with children under 12, only 5% of dads access it compared to 44% of mums.

Dads aren’t taking paid parental leave offered by the government.

Between 2010 and 2019, 1,236,675 females received the government’s paid parental leave. In that same time period there were just 6,250 male recipients.

Source: Five facts every Australian needs to know about men at work

Women Who Need Abortions May Not Get Them As Coronavirus Travel Rules Could Trap Doctors

Exclusive: Australia’s biggest abortion provider resorted to calling the COVID-19 hotline in an attempt to find answers for its patients as health departments aren’t responding.

Four doctors (two in Queensland, one in South Australia and one in New South Wales) were due to travel this week but the South Australian health department has advised MSA doctors leaving that state will need to self-isolate.

Source: Women Who Need Abortions May Not Get Them As Coronavirus Travel Rules Could Trap Doctors

‘I would have died without that support’: Victoria cuts vital court funding

In light of recent family violence tragedies, a decision to cut funding for crucial support is “short-sighted”, former royal commission judge Marcia Neave told Lawyers Weekly.

Almost 20 volunteers with the Court Network will no longer have the resources to assist domestic violence victims in the Family Court and Federal Circuit Court after $130,000 was cut from Victorian Legal Aid and assistance rejected by the federal government.

Established in 1980, and placed in family courts in 1990, Court Network provided free, non-legal support. Prior to being cut in Queensland last year, the network helped more than 205,000 court users. Across 37 locations in Victoria and Queensland, volunteers contributed collectively at least 129,600 hours, equivalent of 65 full-time positions.

Source: ‘I would have died without that support’: Victoria cuts vital court funding – Lawyers Weekly

Law Council wants family law inquiry discontinued after One Nation live broadcast hearings

The Law Council of Australia has called for the abandonment of a federal parliamentary inquiry into the family law system, citing concerns that the hearings are “being used for political purposes” to undermine domestic violence claims made by women.

The Law Council president, Pauline Wright, has written to the chair of the inquiry, Liberal MP Kevin Andrews, to formally complain about the live broadcast on the hearings by One Nation last week.

“What is of most concern to the Law Council is that some of the evidence given, mainly by women, has been the subject of scorn and denigrating comment on the One Nation Facebook sites.

“As well, lawyers from women’s organisations were the subject of particularly negative commentary. Comments include that women lawyers are ‘bitches’, ‘evil’, ‘snakes’, and ‘fugly’.

“As well as some generally offensive comments, many of the comments perpetuate discredited notions about domestic violence; for example, denying that the vast preponderance of domestic violence is perpetrated by men upon women and that women are ‘liars’. The Law Council is particularly concerned that this commentary may incite or excuse domestic violence.”

Source: Law Council wants family law inquiry discontinued after One Nation live broadcast hearings | Law | The Guardian

Firm remains entitled to sack lawyer over Defence Department criticisms

The sacked lawyer led a government-commissioned review in 2011-2012 into physical and sexual abuse in the Australian Defence Force (ADF). The review found numerous cases of abuse inflicted on boys as young as 13 from the 1940s until the 1980s.

He then gave several interviews to Fairfax Media, now Nine, where he said that ADF was “failing victims”. At the time, HWL Ebsworth had government clients.

“The fact that the abuse of children, women and other vulnerable service personnel in the care of the Defence Forces happened is appalling. Successive governments were very slow to remedy the harm caused,” Dr Rumble said back in September.

“I was sacked for speaking out for those who most needed help and urging government to take urgent action on this critical national issue.”

Source: Firm remains entitled to sack lawyer over Defence Department criticisms – Lawyers Weekly

‘Potentially dangerous’: One Nation’s tactics at family law inquiry concern women’s advocates

Zoe Rathus, an expert on family law and domestic violence at Griffith University, told the inquiry the legislated presumption of equal shared parental responsibility had proved “extremely dangerous” and acted to prevent people from airing allegations of domestic violence in the family court.

“Hannah Clarke was allowing Baxter to see the children on a regular basis,” Rathus said. “[The presumption in favour of equal shared parental responsibility] would have been part of all of the information that she will have been given. It would have been almost impossible for her to have resisted doing that.

“And if she had, it would have been very possible for him to accuse her of being an alienator, particularly as this is not a case that would have been described as aggressive violence. We know that family violence can be most dangerous when it isn’t necessarily aggressive.”

Source: ‘Potentially dangerous’: One Nation’s tactics at family law inquiry concern women’s advocates | Australia news | The Guardian

Evidence-based spending on domestic violence is critical

The evidence based responses to preventing harm and death to women and children are ignored by government.

The international researcher into domestic violence, Dr Cris Sullivan finds that specialist domestic violence refuges are the most effective way of supporting women and children.

Millions of dollars are poured into perpetrator programs and available evidence shows a 90 per cent failure rate in changing violent and controlling behaviour.

The network of refuges across NSW dismantled in 2014 by the current LNP must be restored and recurrently funded.

Source: Evidence-based spending on domestic violence is critical | Manning River Times | Taree, NSW

The last thing women need is IWD to be a version of Mother’s Day

The chief executive of the Women’s Resource Centre, Vivienne Hayes, told The Guardian “This use of International Women’s Day by companies is part of the co-option of feminism and women’s equality into a much more mainstream position, that has led to the corporatisation of the advancement of women’s rights.”

The blatant commercialism of a day designed to highlight the very real inequity women and girls continue to face is vile. The absolute last thing any woman or girl the world over needs is a corporate version of Mother’s Day.

On Sunday Westfield Hornsby ran a promotion with a list of seven different ways women could ‘celebrate’ IWD. From getting a blow dry, to a mani/pedi, new dress or eating a pastry, I very nearly threw up.

Source: The last thing women need is IWD to be a version of Mother’s Day

How Debbie Kilroy achieves change for women and girls in the criminal legal system

Debbie Kilroy OAM is the CEO of Sisters Inside and one of Australia’s leading advocates for criminalised women and children.

If I was Premier of a State, or Chief Minister of a Territory, I would close all youth prisons immediately. I’d decriminalise minor, non-violent offences, such as public nuisance and drug possession charges, which account for the vast majority of women prisoners. Trauma is the other key contributor to criminalisation of women, with the vast majority of women prisoners having survived violence. I’d outlaw re-traumatising practices routinely practiced in Australian women’s prisons, particularly strip searching and solitary confinement. I’d ensure domestic violence legislation was gendered (for example, since de-gendered legislation was introduced, breach of DVO’s has joined the top ten reasons for women’s imprisonment in Queensland!) And, I’d outlaw mandatory sentences which do not allow the judiciary to make judgements based on the wider context of an offence. Once prisons emptied, I would close them one by one.

Source: How Debbie Kilroy achieves change for women and girls in the criminal legal system