Australian mother of five stripped of citizenship, leaving two children potentially stateless

An Australian mother of five held in the deteriorating al-Hawl camp of northern Syria has been stripped of her citizenship – retroactive by three years – leaving two of her children potentially stateless and potentially permanently splitting her family.

Currently, there are 19 Australian women and 47 Australian children held in the al-Hawl camp. The Australian government is aware of their identities and the bona fides of their Australian citizenship or right to claim that citizenship.

They are family members of former foreign fighters who have been captured or killed. None of the Australian women in the camp were combatants, and many were coerced, forced or tricked into travelling to Syria.

The youngest child in the Australian group is less than two months old, born on 30 November last year.

Were the children and their mothers able to get to an Australian embassy or consulate, the Australian government would be legally obliged to provide them travel documents to return home.

Source: Australian mother of five stripped of citizenship, leaving two children potentially stateless | World news | The Guardian

Mother whose children were killed by ex pleads to remove domestic abusers’ rights

A WOMAN whose children were killed by her estranged husband is backing the Daily Express crusade to remove parental rights from abusive and rapist fathers. Claire Throssell’s sons Jack, 12, and Paul, nine, were lured into the attic of their home by their father, Darren Sykes, with the promise of a train set and chocolate, while on a visit enforced by the Family Court.

Source: Mother whose children were killed by ex pleads to remove domestic abusers’ rights | UK | News | Express.co.uk

Brain injury from domestic abuse a ‘public health crisis,’ says B.C. researcher

Compared with brain injury research being done on athletes, the research involving people who have suffered similar injuries from intimate partner violence is in its infancy, said van Donkelaar.

The silence and stigma shrouding domestic violence mean those who suffer brain injuries are falling through the cracks of what van Donkelaar calls “an unrecognized public-health crisis in Canada.”

Domestic violence often includes blows to the head, face or neck, as well as strangulation, said van Donkelaar.

“Each of those experiences absolutely have the potential to cause some form of brain injury, similar to what you would see in many collision sports like football or hockey,” he said.

Source: Brain injury from domestic abuse a ‘public health crisis,’ says B.C. researcher | CBC News

Evangelical churches believe men should control women. It can lead to domestic violence

Evangelical churches place religious doctrine over the safety of women.

Traditional understandings about male headship, both in the family and the Church, were promoted as being ordained by God. This meant the authority of men and the subordination of women were considered to be “permanently binding” principles.

Conservative evangelical Christians enthusiastically embraced this as a form of resistance against the feminist movement, and still support these “permanently binding” principles today.

Considering gender inequality is a well-known driver of domestic violence and abuse, peddling women’s subordination as being ordained by God is placing the safety of conservative Christian women at risk.

Source: Evangelical churches believe men should control women. It can lead to domestic violence – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Evangelical churches believe men should control women.

Evangelical Christian churches say a man’s authority is in God’s plan. The belief that men control women breeds domestic violence.

The effect of evangelical Christianity on women’s vulnerability to domestic violence is yet to be measured through a comprehensive survey in Australia. But the extensive reporting on domestic violence in the evangelical Sydney Anglican Diocese challenges harmful and stubborn attitudes that place religious doctrine over the safety of women.

This resistance to cultural change is also shown by teachings on the permanence of the marriage covenant, another way women are potentially trapped in violent marriages.

Considering gender inequality is a well-known driver of domestic violence and abuse, peddling women’s subordination as being ordained by God is placing the safety of conservative Christian women at risk.

Source: Evangelical churches believe men should control women.

Queensland tribunal’s treatment of domestic violence victim a ‘disgrace’

Exclusive: hearing date for case in which a police officer leaked victim’s details was changed at last minute on request of police.

“This seems to be the way our justice system works,” said Renee Eaves, a victims’ advocate and police data misuse victim who is supporting Julie. “If you have access to lawyers, you get accommodations that other people don’t.

“Right through this process it has been stacked against the woman representing herself and quite frankly it’s a disgrace.

“[The tribunal] is supposed to be the ‘people’s court’. Yet they accommodate the police no questions asked because they claim it would be unjust to not be able to have a particular QC.

“The fact they then can’t understand that a mother who is representing herself might need more than a day to arrange to be there, or that she might not be prepared, speaks volumes about how disconnected these decision-makers are from real people.”

Any compensation Julie could receive from the tribunal is capped at $100,000. She says she incurred costs far greater after she twice moved her family in fear after her details were leaked.

Source: Queensland tribunal’s treatment of domestic violence victim a ‘disgrace’ | Australia news | The Guardian

Women who kill their partners are still being treated differently to men

Why are so many women charged with murder, as opposed to manslaughter, if there is strong evidence of domestic violence?

How different is the attitude to men defending property than to women defending their own lives or the lives of their children against violent men? When Richard Osborn-Brooks was arrested after stabbing a burglar who tried to break into his home, the hashtag #FreeRichardOsbornBrooks was launched alongside a petition calling for the Crown Prosecution Service to take no action against him. He was released without charge. “We have the right to protect ourselves in our own home,” tweeted one man, in support of Osborn-Brooks.

The victims of domestic violence, who live in well-founded fear of their lives, have the right to a fair trial. Tragedies could have been avoided had the perpetrators of these crimes been dealt with in the first instance. For the sake of all the Emma Humphreys out there, let us demand that domestic violence becomes a thing of the past.

Source: Women who kill their partners are still being treated differently to men | Julie Bindel | Opinion | The Guardian

Men feel stressed if their female partners earn 40% or more of the income

Men are happier when both partners contribute financially – but get stressed when their female partner earns 40% of household income.

Gender identity norms clearly still induce a widely held aversion to a situation where the wife earns more than her husband.

Source: Men feel stressed if their female partners earn 40% or more of the income

How we are failing victims of Family Violence

[ed: or How to maximise your compensation payout in a patriarchy]

Tip 1

[I]f you want to maximise compensation for personal injury you should ensure you are injured at work, or in a car accident, or at least in circumstances where you can bring a public liability claim against an insured organisation. Even for sporting injuries in NSW, the maximum amount payable as a consequence of a single incident is $171,000 which exceeds what is available to you as a victim of crime.

Tip 2

If you must be a victim of a criminal assault, you should avoid being assaulted in NSW, where the financial assistance available is the lowest in Australia.

Tip 3

The next tip is to ensure that your assailant is a stranger rather than someone who is well known to you, such as an intimate partner or other family member.

[S]tudies indicate that intimate partner violence is the leading contributor to death, disability and illness in Australian women aged 15 to 44.58 It would therefore appear that compensation schemes which are skewed to assist victims of crimes committed by a stranger are skewed to assist male claimants rather than women.

Tip 4

Ensure its a one-off assault with visible physical injuries, not ongoing abuse over years causing psychological injury.

Tip 5

The final tip is to ensure that you are a capable adult rather than a child or person with a disability or other vulnerability and that you, or those who care for you, have the capacity and presence of mind to report the crime to police and health services and lodge a claim within the prescribed time limit. Of course, if they are the perpetrators of the violence against you, this is particularly problematic.

 

Rather than empowering women to leave violent and abusive relationships by providing an effective compensation scheme or at least adequate welfare payments and supported accommodation, avenues of financial and practical support for women are being increasingly restricted. Meanwhile, the government is instead backing microfinance arrangements to assist women to leave abusive relationships, knowing full well that these will leave women further indebted into the future despite being touted as life-saving. This systemic refusal to fairly compensate women for the impact of male violence on their lives or to provide them with any viable means of escape is truly the patriarchy at work.

Source: Printed-Final_Kerr.pdf