Why Australian women should be incandescent with rage right now

If you happen to be a woman living in Australia, now is the time to get angry. Not just alert or alarmed, but truly angry. You need to be furious because If you happen to be a woman living in Australia, now is the time to get angry. Not just alert or alarmed, but truly angry as abortion rights and the family court come under threat

Source: Why Australian women should be incandescent with rage right now | The New Daily Why Australian women should be fighting mad right now

We don’t need another family law inquiry. We need action.

Scott Morrison’s announced a Parliamentary Inquiry into family law system. Hayley Foster from Women’s Safety NSW says action is needed.

You’ll have to forgive women and children’s safety advocates for their suspicion when we’ve just had a Parliamentary Inquiry into the family law system in 2017 followed by a comprehensive review of the family law system undertaken by the Australian Law Reform Commission in 2018 and the government goes off and announces another “wide-ranging inquiry into the family law system” headed up by Liberal MP Kevin Andrews and One Nation’s Pauline Hanson.

In truth, we don’t need another inquiry, we need action.

Source: We don’t need another family law inquiry. We need action.

Family and domestic violence court needed to protect children

To address the problems with the family law system that has put people in danger and resulted in the deaths of children, Women’s Legal Services Queensland (WLSQ) has met with federal politicians to call for a federal and domestic violence court.

Source: Family and domestic violence court needed to protect children – Lawyers Weekly

Abused women losing kids to child protection due to lack of safe housing

New research focusing on women in NSW and the NT uncovers scary stories of women forced to remain in abusive relationships due to a lack of housing, with women losing their children to care because they could not provide a safe environment.

Key points:

  • A lack of housing is sending children of women in abusive relationships into care because they have nowhere safe to take them
  • Indigenous women are 34 times more likely to be hospitalised for domestic violence than their non-Indigenous counterparts
  • One survivor wants authorities to have more power to make perpetrators leave the family home, rather than mothers with children

Source: Abused women losing kids to child protection due to lack of safe housing – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Indian women form a gang and roam their village, punishing men for their bad behaviour

These Indian women were fed up with some men in their village, so they formed a gang to stop gambling, protect their friends from abuse, and topple the patriarchy.

The women are known in these parts as the “Green Gang”.

They’ve made it their collective mission to stamp out domestic violence, alcoholism and gambling, problems they say were endangering their lives.

The Green Gang’s approach is unorthodox.

Together they march through the village confronting men who are troubling their wives or gambling and drinking away their income.

They’ve been known to raid gambling dens, smashing up vessels of bootleg liquor with large sticks.

“We used to talk like this,” she says, draping the head-covering from her sari down over her eyes and mouth.

She whips it off again and grins.

“Now we are 25 women all together. We are united. Our unity makes us strong. This is the reason men now respect us,” Ms Devi said.

Source: Indian women form a gang and roam their village, punishing men for their bad behaviour – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

‘Protecting rapists’: Protesters accuse Japan of failing women

Women’s rights protesters are taking to the streets for the sixth time in as many months as anger mounts in Japan over ‘outdated’ rape laws, after a man was allowed to walk free despite sexually assaulting his daughter for years.

A court ruled the father had sexually abused his child from around the age 13 to 19 and even acknowledged he was violent when she resisted, but he was acquitted because the law requires prosecutors to prove there was overwhelming force, a threat, or that the victim was completely incapacitated.

Source: ‘Protecting rapists’: Protesters accuse Japan of failing women

Brazil: Sexual and physical violence against women on the rise

In Brazil, four girls under 13 are raped every hour and every two minutes police receive a report of violence against women.

Brazil — which is home to over 200 million people — is already among the most dangerous places on earth to be female.

The report found that femicides — when a woman is murdered for being a woman — increased by 4% last year on the previous year, even as the national homicide rate fell 10.8%. In 88% of those cases, the perpetrator was the woman’s partner or former partner.

Source: Brazil: Sexual and physical violence against women on the rise – CNN

Femicide: The murders giving Europe a wake-up call

Finland, held up as a beacon of gender equality, also has one of the EU’s highest murder rates at the hands of an intimate partner.

“The welfare state has given many rights to women, but this policy has concentrated on the labour market… not equality in private life,” she said.

Source: Femicide: The murders giving Europe a wake-up call – BBC News

Religious freedom laws won’t shield all cases

A Christian rehabilitation centre for women would not be shielded from a discrimination claim for turning away a biological male who identified as female under the governments draft laws upholding religious freedom.

Australian Christian Lobby managing director Martyn Iles warned that activists were increasingly using dis­crim­ination law and gender iden­tity as a “weapon” to force religious bodies to compromise their beliefs.

In one, a biological male who identifies­ as female threatened a discrimination action after being subjected to a second interview for admission to a Christian women’s residential rehabilitation program.

Source: Religious freedom laws won’t shield all cases

I Hated My Mother For Refusing To Leave My Abusive Father

For years, I hated my mother for her complicity in the violence my siblings and I grew up with. I fantasized about someone calling the police on our behalf, and prayed that someone would step in and act where my mother wouldn’t. But the extraordinary miscarriage of justice in Neha Rastogi’s case has made me realize that my mother’s mistrust of the system wasn’t unfounded. Domestic violence victims might overcome life-threatening physical, psychological, and financial obstacles to seek help, only to be revictimized by an unforgiving legal system. And when the system fails one of us, it fails us all.

For example, the Department of Homeland Security has released a public, searchable database of detained immigrants that allows abusers to track their victims, and there are draconian laws in at least 29 states that can put mothers in prison for failing to protect their children from abuse, despite clear evidence that these women were abused themselves. (This type of evidence is often used against women instead of being considered a mitigating circumstance; one Oklahoma prosecutor told the court a battered mother charged with enabling child abuse had “made the decision to stay.”) In some of these cases, battered women actually received longer sentences than the men who had abused them and their children.

Source: I Hated My Mother For Refusing To Leave My Abusive Father