Political violence against women is increasing worldwide, University of Texas researchers find

Womens’ increasing demands for equal rights have been met across the globe with widespread political violence, according to a new report by UT researchers.

Source: Political violence against women is increasing worldwide, UT researchers find | The Daily Texan

Political violence against women is increasing worldwide, University of Texas researchers find

Womens’ increasing demands for equal rights have been met across the globe with widespread political violence, according to a new report by UT researchers.

Source: Political violence against women is increasing worldwide, UT researchers find | The Daily Texan

Lesbian visibility matters now more than ever

Get The L Out is about more than defending lesbian’s sexual and political boundaries — it is also about creating a common future for lesbians and other women.

Get The L Out does not mean isolating ourselves; it means making lesbian feminism revolutionary again and working with other feminists towards women’s liberation. The way this alliance between lesbians and other women will look is still under construction, and there are different ways of collaborating, depending on the national and local context. The only sure thing today is that if we do not leave this abusive political relationship with men, more of us will be victims of male violence, and our lesbian sisters of younger generations will not know a world where lesbianism is allowed, let alone celebrated.

Source: Lesbian visibility matters now more than ever

Despatches From The Matriarchy is creating feminist studies and revolution

Become a patron of Despatches From The Matriarchy today: Read posts by Despatches From The Matriarchy and get access to exclusive content and experiences on the world’s largest membership platform for artists and creators.

Source: Despatches From The Matriarchy is creating feminist studies and revolution | Patreon

Feminism, yes. But what kind of feminism?

There are different voices within feminism, and different answers to the question of what still must be done to deepen and complete the feminist revolution.

Discussing these issues is a panel of three experts, featuring Clementine Ford , author of Fight Like a Girl and Boys Will Be Boys, Teela Reid , a Wiradjuri and Wailwan woman, practising lawyer and a powerful advocate for the rights of Aboriginal women, and Dr Petra Bueskens, author of Modern Mothers and Women’s Dual Identities. This event was moderated by La Trobe University’s, Dr Clare Wright , author of the Stella Prize-winning, The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka.

Source: Feminism, yes. But what kind of feminism?, News, La Trobe University

Iran introduces 2,000 new morality police units in response to women’s hijab protests

Iran has introduced 2,000 new morality police units in reaction to what officials call an “increasing defiance” of the compulsory wearing of hijabs.

The move comes amid a growing backlash by women in the Islamic Republic, hundreds of whom have been arrested for taking off their head coverings in public in protest at the law.

Source: Iran introduces 2,000 new morality police units in response to women’s hijab protests

I looked at 100 best-selling picture books: female protagonists were largely invisible

Despite a rise in feminist-themed books for children, picture books remain highly gendered overall, writes Sarah Mokrzycki.

In the Dymocks bestsellers list, 46% of books had male protagonists, while only 17% had female protagonists (in 32% of books there was no lead character). There were only seven female led books in the top 50, compared to 26 male led books.

Sixteen books in the list showed characters in specific occupations (outside of parenthood). In the female-led stories, protagonists only showed ambition for traditional feminine pursuits. There were three ballerinas, three princesses and one fashion designer – Claris, a mouse, who “dreamed about clothes” and “read about handbags in Vanity Fair”. (In this story, a misbehaving girl is also chastised for being “neither proper nor prim!”)

In comparison, the male-led stories showed protagonists in roles ranging from farmers and chefs to zookeepers and scientists.

Not much has changed in the past 20 years.

Source: I looked at 100 best-selling picture books: female protagonists were largely invisible