Stranded Babies, Hurting Moms: COVID-19 Crisis Highlights Problems With Surrogacy

WASHINGTON — The coronavirus pandemic has wreaked havoc in many industries — including the buying and selling of babies through commercial surrogacy. Due to COVID-19 travel restrictions, babies are stranded in different countries than their genetic parents while surrogates and agencies are scrambling to care for them.

And according to human-rights advocates and religious leaders who oppose surrogacy, these pandemic-related problems have brought to light just some of the flaws that necessarily occur in a deeply unethical industry.

One recent study of 124 gestational surrogates who had 494 pregnancies found, “Neonates born from commissioned embryos and carried by gestational surrogates have increased adverse perinatal outcomes, including preterm birth, low birth weight, hypertension, maternal gestational diabetes and placenta previa, compared with singletons conceived spontaneously and carried by the same woman.”

Lahl said that when her dog was born, it was considered “inhumane” under California animal-cruelty laws to take him away from his mother until he was eight weeks old, yet “we will take a human baby right out of its mother’s womb and plop it in to the arms of strangers because they have a commercial contract … and we think that there’s no trauma to that mother and that baby?”

Lahl says that there have been aggressive efforts to legalize surrogacy from gay men who “want to be able to purchase eggs and pay women for their wombs in order to buy babies.”

Source: Stranded Babies, Hurting Moms: COVID-19 Crisis Highlights Problems With Surrogacy

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