The futility of ‘International Day for the Elimination of Sexual Violence in Conflict’

June 19 was the International Day for the Elimination of Sexual Violence in Conflict. The world’s media remained largely silent about the anniversary.

The UN’s recognition of June 19 as the International Day for the Elimination of Sexual Violence in Conflict is a hollow gesture. It’s as empty and meaningless as a beauty queen wishing for world peace.

A first step would be demanding the prosecution of peacekeeping forces who target women and children for sex and actively negate their mission in already unstable regions.

#Unbroken is a movement aimed at increasing awareness of the sexual violence experienced by women in conflict and breaking the cycle of stigma and shame attached to victimhood. Please read these brave women’s stories.

Source: The futility of ‘International Day for the Elimination of Sexual Violence in Conflict’

Women, children massacred in PNG violence

At least 16 women and children have been killed in a tribal massacre in the PNG Highlands village of Karida.

Philip Pimua, a worker from the Department of Health who visited the scene, told the ABC he believed eight of those killed were aged between one and 15, and that two of the women were pregnant.

Source: Women, children massacred in ‘rare’ PNG violence

No platform: my exclusion proves this is an anti-feminist crusade

The campus craze of banning outspoken women from university events and debates across the country is such a gift to the misogynistic “men’s rights” movement, that if I were a conspiracy theorist I would be insisting this is a global plot to end women’s liberation.

Lies and smears against radical feminists and allies who name male violence as the key way in which we are oppressed are nothing new.

Initially, the University of Manchester decided to no platform me and not my opponent, Milo Yiannopoulos, a vocal anti-feminist, (though he too was later disinvited, after protests over the hypocrisy). In doing so, they handed me a gift. Here is proof that this is an anti-feminist crusade, and nothing at all about so called safe spaces.

Source: No platform: my exclusion proves this is an anti-feminist crusade | Opinion | The Guardian

Alabama: pregnant woman shot in stomach is charged in fetus’s death

Marshae Jones was charged with manslaughter, while the woman accused of shooting her walks free, report says.

Alabama is one of 38 states with fetal homicide laws that recognize a fetus as a potential victim.

It is also a “stand-your-ground” state, which means people are allowed to use physical force to defend themselves if their reason is considered “justifiable”.

Source: Alabama: pregnant woman shot in stomach is charged in fetus’s death | US news | The Guardian

Cambron sentenced to prison for killing of boy in Cherokee Park

Cambron pleaded guilty in April to manslaughter and tampering with evidence in connection with the case.

Cambron, 26, was supposed to stand trial for the murder of 12-year-old Ray Allen Etheridge, but this guilty plea avoided that. Upon conviction, Cambron could have been sentenced to life in prison.

Before handing down the sentence, the judge asked whether there was anything the defense wanted addressed. Cambron’s attorney asked that all pronouns in the paperwork be changed from “he” to “she,” because “Joey” Cambron identifies as a transgender female.

Source: Cambron sentenced to prison for killing of boy in Cherokee Park | News | wdrb.com

Violence that leaves no visible mark is a real threat to women

We know that police analysis of Setka’s phone activity reveals he called a woman 25 times on one night and sent her 45 text messages, calling her everything from a “treacherous Aussie f—en c—”, a “f—en dog” to a “weak f—en piece of shit”.

But there is other terrible correspondence. Of the 45 text messages, around half were photographs, some of which obliterated the woman’s face, others which showed her property being discarded.

Online abuse is still abuse. And maybe the case of John Setka will be a moment for the legal system to understand its extent and impact.

Source: Violence that leaves no visible mark is a real threat to women

‘It’s like you go to abuse school’: how domestic violence always follows the same script

In this extract from her book, See What You Made Me Do, Jess Hill traces the psychology of abusers and how they use the same techniques of oppression

Domestic abuse may be as old as intimacy, but we only really started to understand it after the first women’s refuges opened in the 1970s. When women in their thousands fled to these makeshift shelters, they weren’t just complaining about black eyes and raging tempers. They told stories of unfathomable cruelty and violence, and what sounded like orchestrated campaigns of control. It became clear that, although each woman’s story was individual, the overarching narratives were uncannily alike. As one shelter worker said at the time, “It got so I could finish a woman’s story halfway through it. There was this absolutely eerie feeling that these guys were sitting together and deciding what to say and do.”

Today, we know that that the techniques common to domestic abuse match those used by practically anyone who trades in captivity: kidnappers, hostage-takers, pimps, cult leaders. What this reveals is that there is nothing uniquely weak, helpless or masochistic about victims of domestic abuse. Faced with the universal methods of coercive control, their responses are no different from those of trained soldiers.

Source: ‘It’s like you go to abuse school’: how domestic violence always follows the same script | Society | The Guardian

Political violence against women is increasing worldwide, University of Texas researchers find

Womens’ increasing demands for equal rights have been met across the globe with widespread political violence, according to a new report by UT researchers.

Source: Political violence against women is increasing worldwide, UT researchers find | The Daily Texan