‎The Gender at Work Podcast: Episode 12: Patriarchy Impeached – Is this what justice looks like? The Catherine Claxton story on Apple Podcasts

‎This episode walks us through Catherine Claxton’s story, which has been assembled by G@W Senior Associate Joanne Sandler and Julie Thompson, both long time UN staffers. Catherine’s lawyers — Mary Dorman and Ellen Yaroshefsky — recount the events that led Catherine, a junior UN staffer, to charge an Undersecretary General with sexual abuse. What unfolded in response mirrors the Me Too stories of today. Patriarchy closed ranks around the perpetrator and demanded allegiance to authority from those in the system; attempts were made to discredit the complainant – in this case, Catherine – and bury her in bureaucratic legalese as she sought to use the existing mechanisms and processes of adjudication to seek justice; and when all the evidence was in and a third party judgement came in favoring her, the UN buried the report. Finally the perpetrator was fired and was given a glorious send off. Sound familiar? Is this what justice looks like in cases of sexual harassment and abuse? How do we impeach patriarchy and hold it accountable?

Source: ‎The Gender at Work Podcast: Episode 12: Patriarchy Impeached – Is this what justice looks like? The Catherine Claxton story on Apple Podcasts

Marija Gimbutas Triumphant: Colin Renfrew Concedes by Carol P. Christ

Gimbutas argued that the “Kurgan” people introduced Indo-European languages into the lands they conquered, as well as new cultural systems based on domination of warriors and kings over the general populace and the domination of men over women. She stated that the Kurgan invasions of Europe began about 4400 BCE and lasted for several millennia.

[I]n declaring Marija Gimbutas’s Kurgan hypothesis “magnificently vindicated,” Lord Colin Renfrew, considered by many to be “the grand old man” of his field, opened the floodgates. He implicitly gave permission to other scholars to reconsider all of Gimbutas’s theories and perhaps eventually to restore her to her rightful place as one of the most–if not the most–creative, scientific, ground-breaking archaeologists of the twentieth century, “the grand old lady” of her field.

Source: Marija Gimbutas Triumphant: Colin Renfrew Concedes by Carol P. Christ

Women feel better when they work with other women

Our results clearly show that the unpleasant feelings during work are not merely a by-product of being a numerical minority. Because work organizations and the wider society value men and qualities associated with masculinity more than they value women and femininity, women’s affective well-being suffers from being a minority, whereas men’s affective well-being is not affected.

Source: Women feel better when they work with other women

Men feel stressed if their female partners earn 40% or more of the income

Men are happier when both partners contribute financially – but get stressed when their female partner earns 40% of household income.

Gender identity norms clearly still induce a widely held aversion to a situation where the wife earns more than her husband.

Source: Men feel stressed if their female partners earn 40% or more of the income

Angela Ames sex discrimination case: Breast-feeding mom loses because men can lactate too.

Ames’ story reads as every woman’s worst nightmare of what coming back from maternity leave could be like. Ames alleges that when she returned to work, another employee’s things were in her workspace. When she asked for a place to pump breast milk, she was sent to a company nurse. Even though the Nationwide offices had a lactation room, Ames says she was denied access and told she had to fill out paperwork and wait for days for it to be processed in order for them to open the door to let her in. With her breasts swelling and uncomfortable, she says the only options offered to her were rooms that had no privacy.

At this point, Ames says she reached out to the department head for help in getting that lactation room door open, which is when she was met with a resignation letter to sign. Ames reports that her department head said, “Just go home to be with your babies.”

But while the case was primarily decided on this question of whether Ames fought back hard enough, the trial court also ruled that bullying women over breast-feeding cannot be considered sex discrimination, because men can, in theory, lactate, too.

Source: Angela Ames sex discrimination case: Breast-feeding mom loses because men can lactate too.

Women can now shut down male-only debates in Germany’s Green Party

A new ruling, adopted at the party’s conference in Bielefeld, which ran from Friday to Sunday, stipulates that its female members have the right to decide whether a debate continues in the event of gender imbalance among its speakers.
The Greens had previously ruled that women and men were required to speak alternately during party debates.
In the event that only men were available to speak, all members were required to vote on whether the debate should continue, according to the women’s statute in the party’s constitution.
But the new ruling states that only female members should have the power to decide whether a discussion continues in such an event.
The amendment means that in the event of a gender imbalance, male members will no longer have a say in whether a discussion continues, placing power firmly in the hands of female members.

Source: Women can now shut down male-only debates in Germany’s Green Party – CNN

Microsoft women greeted by sceptical court in unequal-pay case

Women engineers who claim Microsoft Corp. discriminates against them for pay and promotions faced tough questions from a federal appeals court weighing whether their ground-breaking lawsuit should become a class action.

The lawsuit against Microsoft is the first in a series of gender-pay-disparity cases against big technology companies to reach an appeals court over the question of class-action status.

The three plaintiffs want to represent about 8,630 peers who have worked for the company since 2012. Pursuing the case on behalf a large group would give the women much stronger leverage in settlement negotiations before a trial.

Women employees at Twitter Inc. lost their bid for class-action status in July 2018 in San Francisco state court. Similar cases against Oracle Inc. and Google are pending.

Source: Microsoft women greeted by sceptical court in unequal-pay case

Gender pay gap is at its most extreme for women in their 50s

New research released by UK based organisation Rest Less has revealed that the gender pay gap at its most extreme for women in their 50s.

Last year, government research showed age discrimination occurred at an alarming rate in Australian organisations, where 30 percent of surveyed employers admitted to not employing people over 50.

While In 2017, the National Bureau of Economic Research tested for the prevalence of age discrimination in hiring and found that that the résumés of older women got far fewer callbacks than both those of older men and younger applicants of either gender. As The Guardian columnist Suzanne Moore puts it, “Being good at your job seemingly counts for little. Try getting a new job past 55.”

Source: Gender pay gap is at its most extreme for women in their 50s

Struggling with the juggle? Working parents report difficulties managing their health

[O]ne in three mothers (34 per cent) reported missing out on opportunities for promotion due to taking paid parental leave, compared with 11 per cent of fathers.

And around a third of women again (35 per cent) reported missing out on promotion opportunities due to their use of flexible work, compared with 14 per cent of men.

Other key findings from the preliminary results include:
• Nearly half of all respondents (46 per cent) said that a worker’s commitment to their job was questioned if they used family-friendly work arrangements.
• Most parents (85 per cent) reported that paid parental leave was offered at their workplaces and around half of all mothers and fathers had accessed all or part of the parental leave benefit.
• But more than half of fathers (57 per cent) and one-third of mothers reported the leave was ‘too short’.
• Twenty-three per cent of mothers and 13 per cent of fathers reported receiving negative comments from managers and supervisors for using paid parental leave.

Source: Struggling with the juggle? Working parents report difficulties managing their health

‘She taught me to survive’: Kristina Keneally’s fight for parents of stillborns

In Australia, six babies every day are stillborn with the rate remaining largely unchanged for two decades.

[M]ost organisations in Australia don’t extend their parental leave policies to cover employees recovering after a stillbirth. Keneally’s quest is therefore to have more employers standardise this as part of their framework; a change that would not impact a company’s bottom line given they’d already accounted for that employee’s leave.

Source: ‘She taught me to survive’: Kristina Keneally’s fight for parents of stillborns