‘She taught me to survive’: Kristina Keneally’s fight for parents of stillborns

In Australia, six babies every day are stillborn with the rate remaining largely unchanged for two decades.

[M]ost organisations in Australia don’t extend their parental leave policies to cover employees recovering after a stillbirth. Keneally’s quest is therefore to have more employers standardise this as part of their framework; a change that would not impact a company’s bottom line given they’d already accounted for that employee’s leave.

Source: ‘She taught me to survive’: Kristina Keneally’s fight for parents of stillborns

The Visible Farmer initiative showcasing power of women in agriculture

On International Day of Rural Women 2019, the Visible Farmer campaign is working hard to put a spotlight on the often hidden faces of women in agriculture.

According to the Australian Federation of Business and Professional Women, half of all our food is produced by the work of women.

Source: The Visible Farmer initiative showcasing power of women in agriculture

US sprinter Allyson Felix beats Usain Bolt’s gold medal record 10 months after giving birth

A 33-year-old U.S. sprinter broke a world record for gold medals Sunday, toppling former record-holder Usain Bolt.

Allyson Felix won her 12th gold medal at the World Championships during the mixed-gender 4x400m relay, Business Insider reports. Bolt was the previous World Championships record-holder, since 2013, with a total of 11 gold medals.

It was Felix’s first race since giving birth to her daughter, Camryn, in November 2018.

As Felix gets ready for her fifth Olympics, she also has been vocal against Nike’s long-standing maternity policies for sponsored athletes. She’s pushing so that she and other female athletes won’t be impacted financially for being pregnant.

Source: US sprinter Allyson Felix beats Usain Bolt’s gold medal record 10 months after giving birth | WBNS-10TV Columbus, Ohio | Columbus News, Weather & Sports

Sex at the High Court: On the Redefinition of “Sex” in Civil Rights Law and Faulty Accounts of “Discrimination”

Activists are asking the Court to rewrite our nation’s civil rights laws in a way that would directly undermine one of their main purposes: protecting the equal rights of girls and women. Congress did not legislate such an outcome, and the Court should not usurp Congress’s authority by imposing such an extreme policy on the nation. Biology is not bigotry, and the Court should not conclude otherwise.

Source: Sex at the High Court: On the Redefinition of “Sex” in Civil Rights Law and Faulty Accounts of “Discrimination” – Public Discourse

Only 2% of global art auction spending is on work by women, study finds

A new study has found that despite perceived signs of progress, the art world remains overwhelmingly male-dominated.

According to a report assembled by In Other Words & artnet News, the last 10 years has found a lack of growth for female representation in art with just 2% of global art auction spending on work by women. This figure is also unevenly distributed, with five artists making up 40.7% of this figure and Yayoi Kusama in particular accounting for 25% alone.

“The art world is simply not the liberal, progressive bastion that it imagines itself to be,” said Helen Molesworth, a former chief curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, “and you can’t solve a problem you can’t own.”

Source: Only 2% of global art auction spending is on work by women, study finds | Art and design | The Guardian

French council fined for having too many female managers

A district council in eastern France has been fined €90,000 (£81,000) for appointing too many women to its management team in breach of public-sector gender parity laws.

Public institutions are usually fined for failing to meet the statutory 40 per cent quota of women in top jobs under a 2012 parity law. This is the first time a state body is known to have been penalised for appointing more than 60 per cent women to senior positions. Few employers were aware that the maximum limit could apply to women as well as men.

Jean-François Debat, the chairman of the Bourg-en-Bresse council, is unapologetic. “I think it’s comical to be punished for this reason,” he said. “Not only do I stand by our appointments, I’m proud of having so many women in our management teams.”

Source: French council fined for having too many female managers

The First Woman to Win a Nobel Prize in Medicine Was Paid 1/10 the Salary of Her Research Partner

The groundbreaking scientist Dr. Gerty Cori was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize in Medicine and the first American woman to win a Nobel Prize in a scientific field. She shared the Nobel with her husband and lifelong research partner, Carl. Although their experience and education was identical, it took thirteen years before she was finally promoted to the same rank as him at the university where they worked. Together, the Coris made numerous breakthroughs in medical research, including discoveries that paved the way for understanding and developing treatments for diabetes and other metabolic diseases. Despite the institutionalized sexism she faced throughout her career, Gerty’s tremendous scientific mind could not be denied — and her work would change the field of biochemistry forever.

Source: The First Woman to Win a Nobel Prize in Medicine Was Paid 1/10 the Salary of Her Research Partner | A Mighty Girl

Enhanced maternity pay packages don’t discriminate against men – what new ruling means for shared parental leave

The UK Court of Appeal ruled in late May that it is not sex discrimination for employers to enhance maternity pay but only provide the statutory rate of shared parental pay.

The court found that women on maternity leave are in a materially different situation to men taking shared parental leave, and so, as the positions are incomparable, there can be no discrimination.

Source: Enhanced maternity pay packages don’t discriminate against men – what new ruling means for shared parental leave